Saturday, April 12, 2014

"In Silence II"

 
Silverpoint drawing on tinted gesso on 8-7/8" diameter wooden fiber board.


This image can also be viewed on Ipernity

All images are copyrighted and may not be used for any purpose without my written permission.

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

"Un(titled)"

 
Graphite drawing on Strathmore paper


This image can also be viewed on Ipernity

All images are copyrighted and may not be used for any purpose without my written permission.

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

"Within"

Silverpoint drawing on tinted gesso on Arches board


This image can also be viewed on Ipernity

All images are copyrighted and may not be used for any purpose without my written permission.

Saturday, November 30, 2013

"Leaf"

Silverpoint drawing on black gesso on mat board


This image can also be viewed on Ipernity

All images are copyrighted and may not be used for any purpose without my written permission.

Saturday, November 9, 2013

"Arctic Lake"

Silverpoint drawing on tinted gesso on Canson board


This image can also be viewed on Ipernity

All images are copyrighted and may not be used for any purpose without my written permission.

Saturday, November 2, 2013

"Icebergs"

 Silverpoint drawing on gesso prepared and ink tinted Canson board
 
For the last several weeks, I’ve been hard at work on experimenting with the silverpoint/metalpoint drawing medium, and I’ve become quite fond of the process. For those of you who are unfamiliar with the medium, silverpoint/metalpoint is a drawing medium that is made by dragging a metal rod or wire across an appropriately prepared surface. This process can be traced back to the 13th century, and predates graphite pencil as we know it today. Let me just say first of all, this medium is not for those wanting speedy gratification. In order to create a metalpoint drawing, a surface has to be prepared with a gesso (at least 3 layers) so the metal can make a mark. Once the surface is prepared, the drawing is executed by crosshatching to build up tone and texture. Applying pressure does little to no good for building darker tones; this is done by layering your crosshatches and parallel lines until the desired tonal density is achieved. Let me reiterate, this is not for those who want speedy gratification. On average, a 5 x 7 drawing can take up to 40 hours or more to complete, depending on the amount of detail in the drawing. The process is extremely meticulous, and relies on raw talent and good draftsmanship since the marks cannot be erased. I personally haven’t been this intrigued by a process since I began working with alternative process photography a few years ago. It’s meditative, it forces you to exercise patience and discipline, and most of all, it’s just beautiful to look at (in person); digital pictures cannot display the true beauty of this medium. In the near future I will be posting more examples of these metal gems. Until then, check out this site if you wish to find out more about this historic medium.
 

This image can also be viewed on Ipernity

All images are copyrighted and may not be used for any purpose without my written permission.

Saturday, July 6, 2013

New Exhibition


I am honored to announce that on 07/13/2013, 3 of my botanical charcoal drawings will be exhibited at Second Helpings Gallery at 1502 Williamson Rd NE Roanoke, VA 24012. The exhibition duration will last several months so there is plenty of time and opportunity to visit. The last day of exhibition for these drawings will be announced several weeks in advance.
 
Here is one of the drawings to be included:

"Orchid"
Charcoal on Tea Toned Cotton Paper